CREATING A MOODBOARD

Starting from scratch when you’re decorating a room can be really hard, even if you’ve scoured pinterest and have a pretty good idea of what you want – visualising everything together isn’t always as easy as you’d think. That’s why I love creating room moodboards – I can bring in photos of my existing furniture and take screenshots from pieces that are in my virtual shopping basket and then sling everything together all on one screen to see if it all works.

I use photoshop mostly, which, in my opinion, is the best tool for creating moodboards, but there’s some great apps that can achieve a really similar result if you don’t already have a subscription. Canva has great options for collages too, which you can use on either their website or the app.

I usually start by adding the pieces I already have in my room, so try to find photos of your furniture- ideally against a white background so they’re easier to cut out. Spread them out all across the page, don’t worry about what goes where yet! After I’ve got all of my current pieces on the screen, I start to scroll through my web screenshots of the pieces that I’m obsessing over and then add those into the moodboard – again, don’t worry too much about what’s next to what – it’s not important at the moment.

Once you’ve got a mixture of furniture and soft furnishings on the screen – have a look to see which colours or tones you’ve repeated- there will most likely be some kind of ‘theme’ across all of it. If you’ve already decided on wall paint colour, add a screenshot of that in too – I like this to be the main part of my moodboard, because generally, it’s the biggest area in the room itself – so everything needs to sit together against that wall colour. Again, if you already have your flooring, or know exactly what you want – add that in so you can see how it sits against the wall colour and the pieces you’ve picked. If you’re wanting a rug, add that in near your flooring image, it’ll be laying on top of it, so you need to be able to see that it looks ok!

Now is the time I usually have a little re-jig of the layout. As I said before, I tend to have the wall paint colour taking up around 1/3 of the page, so I put that towards one side of the screen. I then move the flooring and rug images nearer to the bottom of the screen – kind of like it would be in real life. If I’ve added in a chair, I’ll place that near the floor image, again like it would be in real life. I usually put a sofa or the main piece of furniture overlapping the wall paint colour so that I can see that the tones blend nicely and try to put pieces near what they would be near in my actual room. If you’ve added screenshots of cushions, layer those on top of the sofa/armchair – it’s all about mocking it up digitally before you take the plunge and recreate it in your own home. It’s sometimes hard to get the scale right when you’ve taken a screenshot of a product, but try to keep pieces to a scale that looks realistic.

Take a step back, lock your phone, close your laptop – take your mind off your moodboard. I can guarantee that when you go back to it, you’ll know a. if it’s missing something or b. that it’s absolutely perfect and you’re in love. If you can’t figure out what it’s missing – take a closer look – are the colours clashing in a way that is off-putting? Does that side table look ridiculous next to your sofa? Do you need to re-think your soft furnishings? If you’re not happy with your moodboard, it’s a process of elimination – take pieces out and add them back in in a different place on the moodboard – does it look better or do you need to ditch it?

Practice makes perfect when it comes to moodboarding – the more you do it, the more you realise your own style and will only pick out pieces that actually work together. I find it kind of therapeutic, I spend hours at a time creating room moodboards – I don’t know what I’ll do when the house renovation has finished!

If you’re still struggling, I offer a £49 Moodboard service where I can create your dream room – find out more here

 

29th January 2019
11th February 2019

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